keep your project on track

Podcast 48 – The 6 simple questions that will keep your project on track

Podcast 48 – The 6 simple questions that will keep your project on track

 
 
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Keep your project on track

In this podcast, Elise Stevens speaks with Millie Swann, and Executive Business Change Strategist and Heart-Based Leadership Mentor about the 6 simple questions that will keep your project on track.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed or exhausted in your work, or your project is not quite on track, this podcast can help you regain control.

Millie mentors CEOs and other decision makers to turn challenging and seemingly unresolvable situations into prosperous outcomes. She has experience in change management, business strategy, business transformation and organisational development, and is also a qualified yoga and meditation teacher.

She says this combination of skills means she can identify and shift energetic blocks for her clients and allow them to work through the underlying issues preventing them from achieving true success. 

Points raised in this podcast:

  • A project can get off track if project outcomes are not clear from the beginning.
  • Project managers should ask 6 simple questions, known as the Rule of W: what, why, who, where, when and how? These are the 6 simple questions that will keep your project on track. Keep your answers to these questions brief, they should fit on one piece of paper.
  • Some of the questions may seem more essential than others, but in times of confusion or if the project appears to be off-track, coming back to these 6 simple questions can help you find direction.
  • Coming back to the Rule of W can also eliminate issues arising from strong personalities or leadership struggles and keep the conversation objective rather than personal.
  • Give every member of your team the chance to answer these 6 simple questions to make sure all members of the team agree on the project’s purpose and direction.
  • Good leadership and good communication means listening 80% of the time, and speaking 20%.
  • Having a variety of personality styles and opinions within a project team should be considered an advantage rather than a negative, so long as all members of the team can respect each other’s differences.
  • The quietest person on the team may well have the best ideas.

Find out more about Millie Swann at her website http://millieswann.com.au

Listen to the Podcast:

 

Additional Resources

  • Portent

    10 Ways to be a better team leader

  • TeamClock

    Great article about why you should listen to the quietest person in team

  • Teamwork

    10 Ways to strengthen your team

 

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